The Lexington Bra Pattern by Orange Lingerie

Introducing the Lexington Bra Pattern!

It is always thrilling to offer a new sewing pattern and today I am super excited to introduce you to our newest bra sewing pattern, the Lexington!

I have been wanting to add a wireless bra to our collection for a while now, but getting support and shaping without underwires is quite the challenge! Of course I love a good challenge and after much testing and fitting, the Lexington is everything I wanted it to be! How did we do it?! Without the ability to use underwires we switched to two other methods to gain support and shaping: cut-and-sew foam and side seam boning.

The cut-and-sew foam adds shaping and support to the cups with the extra added benefit of expanding the universe of fabric choices. With the cup structure that foam provides you are not limited to a low to no stretch fabric like most of our cut-and-sew bras (though those fabrics work just fine). In fact, this bra works best if you use a stretch material for the cup cover and cup lining. Hello jersey prints! (You can even use jersey over the power net band, but that is another post!)

Of course, this bra can also be made without the cut-and-sew foam for a more relaxed garment. We have even been playing around with making sports bras from this design in the studio and we can’t wait to share that tutorial!

The side seam boning is a nice addition in this bra, especially for D and DD cup sizes. It helps keep the breasts directed forward, away from the underarm, something that is an issue with most bralettes and wire-free bras.

The strapping trim on the Lexington bra was inspired by the “Cross Your Heart” bras in the 1970s and brought to the modern era by making them a design feature. They are bold, graphic and functional all at once.

As always, the pattern material includes the clear fully illustrated instructions you have come to expect from Orange Lingerie and each size is presented separately with the seam lines.

Given the design, the Lexington bra pattern will only be available for A to DD cups in size 30 to 40 bands. As with all of our bra patterns, I had the pattern graded up and then tried that sample on our size 34H fit model. It was immediately clear to both of us that this style was not going to work for the larger volumes.

I hope you enjoy the Lexington bra pattern as much as I do! Be sure to tag your makes with #LexingtonBra and/or #OrangeLingerie so I can find them all. I love seeing everyone’s unique version of our sewing patterns!

The Lexington Bra Pattern by Orange Lingerie
The Lexington Bra Pattern by Orange Lingerie
The Lexington Bra Pattern by Orange Lingerie
How to Make Tiny Bows for Your Lingerie 

How to Make Tiny Bows for Your Lingerie

I prefer making lingerie bows myself largely because pre-made bows always seem a bit “off”. Either they are tied strangely or are just not quite the right color. I also feel that making my own bow adds that extra special touch that elevates the finish of the garment. Of course, once I realized how much fun it is to shop for ribbon, well, that was it for me! 

How to Make Tiny Bows for Your Lingerie

To make a bow you can use a ribbon, as shown in this tutorial, or you can follow my perfect spaghetti strap tutorial to create a thin tube of fabric to tie into a bow. So many choices when we make our own! Don’t you just love sewing?! 

To help me tie perfect tiny little bows every time, I use this handy tool called “Bow Easy”. There are several different size bows you can make using this super simple tool. I generally use the 1 ¼” bow template with ¼” ribbon for most bra bows, but you might experiment with different sizes based on the width of your ribbon. 

Here are the steps! 

1. To determine how much ribbon to cut to make a bow, multiply the finished bow size by 8. For a 1¼” ” bow I cut 10” of ribbon (1.25 x 8 = 10). 

2. Working from left to right, wrap the ribbon around the template leaving ¼” – ½” extra ribbon on top. Wrap the ribbon near the bottom of the template, as shown, to facilitate later steps. Hold the end down with your left thumb on the template.

How to Make Tiny Bows for Your Lingerie

3. Continue to wrap the ribbon around the template so that it wraps back around to the top. Hold that loop, along with the original ribbon end, with your left thumb.

How to Make Tiny Bows for Your Lingerie 

4. Bring the tail of the ribbon through the top of the center channel without twisting the ribbon. This should form a loop on top of the template. 

How to Make Tiny Bows for Your Lingerie 

5. Wrap the tail of the ribbon around the center channel, and, still working from left to right, bring it up through the loop you just formed.

How to Make Tiny Bows for Your Lingerie 

6. Pull to make a snug knot. 

How to Make Tiny Bows for Your Lingerie 

7. Push the tail end through the top of the center channel again to flatten the knot a bit and slide the completed bow off the template.

How to Make Tiny Bows for Your Lingerie 
How to Make Tiny Bows for Your Lingerie 

8. Trim the ends to your preferred length. I like them when the bow legs are about the same length as the loops, but sometimes it’s fun to play with the bow’s proportions! 

How to Make Tiny Bows for Your Lingerie 

Here is an animated summary of the steps to give you an idea of the overall movement.

8. Finally, seal the cut edges of the bow ends, lightly bring the raw ribbon edge to a flame from a lighter or candle to melt any frayed threads together. The flame should just kiss the ribbon edge. Please handle any flames carefully! I recommend doing this over a sink with some water in it for added safety. Fray check is another alternative to keep the ends of your new bow tidy through wash and wear.

How to Make Tiny Bows for Your Lingerie 

Now you can attach the bow to your bra or other lingerie! Here we added the orange bow to our Boylston bra

How to Make Tiny Bows for Your Lingerie

Fun tip: you can make two-colored bows, using the exact same method but with a double layer of ribbon!

How to Make Tiny Bows for Your Lingerie 

If buying this tool isn’t in your budget but you’d still like to make your own bows, you can get away with using a large dinner fork instead! Just hold the fork with the tines pointing down and use the tines as the template. It won’t be quite as easy but with a little practice the results will be almost the same. 

How to Make Tiny Bows for Your Lingerie 

Just a word of warning: bow tying is addictive! ☺

How to Make Tiny Bows for Your Lingerie
How to Make Tiny Bows for Your Lingerie
How to Make Tiny Bows for Your Lingerie
How Often You Should Wash Your Bra

How Often You Should Wash Your Bra

One of the most common questions I am asked is “How often should I wash my bra?” and every time I answer, I am greeted with a shocked response.

So here it is: If you want your bras to perform at their best and last as long as possible, you need to wash your bra after wearing it once, or maximally twice. If you need to wear your bras twice before washing, you should give the bra a day off in between wearings. The elastic needs time to recover and to go back to a neutral position.

How Often You Should Wash Your Bra

It is pretty easy to understand why this is the case. The bra is worn directly against your body, so it collects body oils and skin cells. Elastic, a key component of the bra band and straps, does not respond well to either substance. When these materials get into the elastic its ability to stretch and contract is decreased. It takes a proper wash to remove these substances so the elastic can go back to doing its job of keeping the bra snug against the body.

This begs the follow up question, “How do you wash a bra?”

How Often You Should Wash Your Bra

Let’s start with what you do not do: do not put your bra in the washing machine. I know you want to because it is so easy. But on behalf of your bra, I beg you not to do it!

Bras are a delicate and carefully engineered garment. As part of its supportive structure, many bras have wires encased under each bra cup. Those wires do important support work in your bra. They need to keep their shape and stay put. In the washer (yes even in the delicate cycle), the water pressure and the pressure of clothing around the bra (even in a lingerie bag) could cause the wire to twist and lose its shape. Think about your other clothes too. Those bra hooks can catch on whatever else you have in the washer or the lingerie bag (yes, even if you fasten them before you put them in the wash).

What about the dryer, you ask? I’ll be blunt: the dryer will ruin the elastic. I don’t care what temperature you use. Elastic is key to the bra’s function, and, as outlined above, elastic needs to be cared for properly.

All of this means one thing: hand washing and air-drying are the way to clean the bra. To wash a bra, use lukewarm water and a gentle detergent. Gentle is the operative word. I like Soak wash since it is widely available in even comes in handy travel packets.

How Often You Should Wash Your Bra

To clean your bras, separate by color then soak for 20 to 30 minutes to allow the soap and water to work their cleaning magic.

How Often You Should Wash Your Bra

Then rinse the soap from the bras in lukewarm water. To gently extract the excess water from a bra without squeezing it, lay the bra inside a towel and gently press down on the towel.

How Often You Should Wash Your Bra

Then lay the bra flat on a towel to dry. This soak-and-press technique is actually quite easy and does not require much active time at all. My strategy is to clean bras weekly, letting them soak while I take an extra-long and luxurious weekend shower.

How Often You Should Wash Your Bra

The overall life of your bra, that is how long it will provide meaningful support and shaping, depends on the quality of the bra (materials and construction), cup size, frequency of wear and how the bra is cared for. The care of your bra is one of the factors that is completely within your control and we all want our beautiful handmade bras to last as long as possible!

How Often You Should Wash Your Bra
How Often You Should Wash Your Bra
How Often You Should Wash Your Bra
How To Keep Your Bra Strap From Falling by Orange Lingerie

How to Keep Your Bra Straps from Falling

You know the feeling; you are sitting in an important meeting and suddenly you feel a bra strap slide down your shoulder. There are a few reasons why this might be happening and depending on the cause, there are concrete steps you can take to prevent strap slip.

How To Keep Your Bra Strap From Falling

Let’s back up and just quickly refresh on the role of the straps in the bra. The most important thing to know is that they are not responsible for support! The role of bra straps is to keep the bra in the correct position on the body. If the straps are slipping off the shoulders, they won’t be able to do their job and the bra will start to sag. We don’t want that!

How To Keep Your Bra Strap From Falling

There are several things that can cause bra straps to fall. Let’s take a look at the main causes and how to fix each one.

AGE
The first and most common cause is that the bra is worn out and stretched out so the elastic no longer expands and contracts. One sign this is the cause is that you have the strap tightened as far it can go, and it still falls off your shoulder. The best solution here is to replace the bra. A bra with “dead” elastics can no longer do its job to support and shape your body. It is time to make a new bra!

ADJUSTMENT
Another reason straps slip is that they are not adjusted properly. I see this happen a lot with new bras fresh off the machine. In the excitement to try on the bra, the strap is not adjusted to the correct length. In this case, you just need to adjust the straps so they fit more snuggly to the body.

How To Keep Your Bra Strap From Falling

SLIDER SIZE
One cause of strap slippage is not very obvious. The straps may be slipping through the sliders and out of where you want them set. This means that the sliders may be too wide for the strap elastic. If you have different rings and sliders sizes in the right color for your bra and a desire to unpick some stitching, you can re-make the straps (it is fiddly but doable). A simpler solution is to be sure when you are making your next bra that the strap elastic is secure when threaded through the slider. The elastic should not move very easily through the slider.

How To Keep Your Bra Strap From Falling

STRAP LOCATION
Strap slippage can also be caused by the strap position on the bra. If straps are placed too far out on your shoulder they are predisposed to slipping. There are a couple of ways to fix this but both adjustments should be made to the pattern before you cut out the bra.

When adjusting the bra strap location, you can move the straps in toward the center of the body on the front, back or on both sides of the bra. Where you decide to make the change depends on the style and the look of the bra.

To move the straps on the front of the bra, start by marking the outer edge of the desired front strap location. Do this by placing the strap on the pattern and marking the outer edge where the strap meets the upper cup.

How to Keep your Bra Strap from Falling

Then redraw the underarm curve on the upper cup to smoothly transition into the outer edge of the strap in its new location.

How to Keep your Bra Strap from Falling

To make the change in the back of the bra, redraw the scoop on the back band with the topmost point of the band corresponding to the desired strap location. Moving the back straps is where I start to adjust strap placement if the bra looks beautiful and proportional on the front of the body.

How to Keep your Bra Strap from Falling

In the above tutorial I used the Boylston bra to illustrate the pattern changes. To find out how to make these changes with the Marlborough bra, see this tutorial. For moving the straps on the Devonshire bra, you can read more here.

Happy bra making!

How To Keep Your Bra Strap From Falling
How To Keep Your Bra Strap From Falling
How To Keep Your Bra Strap From Falling
It's a Bra Anniversary - Marlborough

It’s a Bra Anniversary!

This month our Marlborough bra sewing pattern celebrates its five-year anniversary. It is hard to believe that five years have passed since we published our first sewing pattern! Since 2014 we have published over one dozen lingerie sewing patterns, including two underwear patterns (the Kingston thong and the Montgomery brief) that I created just so I could have a matching Marlborough bra and underwear set!

While the Marlborough pattern was our first pattern, based on pattern reviews and makes, it remains one of your favorites (mine too!). To celebrate its five-year anniversary, we decided to update the pattern instructions for all sizes to include even more information to help you make your own beautiful and professional looking lingerie. The sewing pattern itself, a time-tested classic, remains unchanged.

It's a Bra Anniversary - Marlborough
Image Credit: @katiemakesadress

Let’s talk about what we updated. First of all, we invest a great deal of time and effort in our instructions to make it as easy as possible for you to make your own lingerie and our unique, detailed illustrations are a big part of that. For the updated instructions, we wanted to make the the illustrations larger, so it was even easier to see the all the construction detail for each step.

It's a Bra Anniversary! Marlborough

We also wanted to include elements that we have added to our other bra patterns over the years including more information on materials, cutting instructions and construction layout diagrams.

It's a Bra Anniversary! Marlborough

Finally, after teaching the Marlborough bra workshop for nearly as long as the pattern has been around, I wanted to streamline the instruction flow and add some extra helpful steps.

The Orange Lingerie Marlborough Bra Anniversary
Image Credit: @katiemakesadress

If you have already purchased this pattern, the update is available at no additional cost. If you purchased the Marlborough bra pattern through our website, you will receive an email with instructions on how to access the updated file.

If you purchased the pattern through Etsy, you will need to message us via Etsy referencing your order number and provide your email address so that we can get a fresh copy of the pattern to you. This process is necessary because Etsy does not have the ability to push out updated files.

If you have not purchased the Marlborough bra pattern yet, now is a great time to give it a try!

It's a Bra Anniversary - Marlborough
It's a Bra Anniversary - Marlborough
It's a Bra Anniversary - Marlborough
Even more sewing tips for bra making!

Even More Sewing Tips for Bra Making!

Over the summer I shared a lot of my favorite pro tips for bra making. As I was putting those posts together, I thought of even more tips to help you make your own beautiful and professional looking lingerie! Below I capture a few of my favorites.


Sewing Small Pieces

Even more sewing tips for bra making!

Sewing small pieces can be tricky. If you are having difficulty you can always sew from the middle outwards. No one ever said you have sew from end to end! This can make it easier to control those tiny and sometimes slippery bits of fabric in a bra making project.

Even more sewing tips for bra making!

Another way to sew small and/or slippery pieces is to start your seam with a small fabric leader or piece of paper at the beginning of a seam. A fabric leader also helps if your machine wants to eat the fabric at the start of the seam.

Even more sewing tips for bra making!

Chain sewing where you sew continuously from one seam to another is another great technique and saves construction time overall as well.


Working with Shifty Fabrics

Even more sewing tips for bra making!

When sewing power net (or power mesh) to another fabric on a conventional sewing machine, such as when you attach the frame to the band, sew with the power net on the bed of the machine and the other fabric on top. With this method the power mesh seamline does not get stretched and you get a nice flat straight seam. Of course, you could also overlock this seam on your serger!


Working with Bra Kits

Even more sewing tips for bra making!

Before you cut out your pattern, check trim and elastic sizes on your pattern and compare them to what you plan to use. On Orange Lingerie bra sewing patterns these lines are all clearly marked on each pattern piece for easy reference.

This tip is especially important if you are using a bra making kit where the trim and elastic widths vary and may be different from the pattern allowances. It is so much easier to make any necessary adjustments before you cut out your garment.


Add to the Band

Even more sewing tips for bra making!

I have students add 1 ¼” to the band, regardless of the size they are making, to account for the different properties of various Power Net fabrics and elastics. This adjustment (tutorial here) gives you some breathing room (literally) to account for different materials.

This is especially important for the A to DD size ranges for the Marlborough and Boylston bras since those bands were drafted to be firm using a fairly stretchy power mesh and a soft and stretchy band elastic.

Over the years bra kits have evolved to include firmer power net and firmer elastic. This is great for support but using the kit materials without first increasing the band could lead to a bra that is too tight! It is super easy to make a band smaller if it turns out to be too big, but it is difficult to make a band larger!

That is why for insurance, and to avoid a lot of extra work with stretch calculations, I just add 1 ¼” to the band. You can read the tutorial here.


Check the Closure Height

Even more sewing tips for bra making!

I teach this adjustment in all of my workshops and have been adding this to our bra patterns as well as a reminder to check the closure height of the bra and to adjust as necessary to precisely fit your hook and eye closure. You can read the tutorial here.


Track Your Changes

Even more sewing tips for bra making!

Take notes while you sew! Write down the settings on your machine like your sightline/guide you use on your presser foot, and your preferred presser foot for topstitching.

Also write down the date of any pattern changes along with what you changed and what you want to alter next time. I also recommend taking pictures of each version of the garment on the body and storing all the information your preferred note taking app. I cannot even begin to tell you how important my notes are to the design and pattern making process!


Add your bra making tips to the comments below!

Even more sewing tips for bra making!
Even more sewing tips for bra making!
Even more sewing tips for bra making!
Our Best Bra Sewing Tips and Tricks

Our Best Bra Sewing Tips and Tricks

It is hard to believe that I have been writing about how to make your own beautiful and professional looking lingerie for over 9 years! With so many sewists focused on bra making this month with the “#BRAugust” Instagram photo challenge, I thought it would be helpful to share some my top tips from the archive to help you achieve bra making success!


Your Guide to Bra Making Materials

Our Best Bra Sewing Tips and Tricks

This is one of our most popular posts and with good reason! I walk you through the materials to make a bra, their properties, qualities and how to shop for them all.


How to Manipulate Bra Making Materials

Because I like fabric variety, I show you how to manipulate fabric so it can be used for bra making. This usually means stabilizing or otherwise beefing up a fabric that would not work well on its own.


Bra Making Notions Explained

Our Best Bra Sewing Tips and Tricks

Bra making generally requires several materials in addition to just the fabric and that can be confusing for new bra makers. This popular post that explains all the notions and supplies you need to make an underwire bra and, like the posts on materials, I also cover what to look for when shopping for your own supplies.


How to Prepare for a Bra Making Project

Our Best Bra Sewing Tips and Tricks

Good preparation really helps set you up for success. This post talks about helpful sewing notions including needles and thread as well as good workroom practices.


How to Cut Out your Bra Pattern

In line with preparing for success, this post shows you the most accurate way to cut out your bra pattern. To take this a step further, I also wrote about how to look at print placement in the cutting process.


How to mark your fabric

Our Best Bra Sewing Tips and Tricks

Never snip those notches when making a bra! This post shows you the right way to mark your project for easy and efficient sewing at the machine.


Correct Construction Every Time

Our Best Bra Sewing Tips and Tricks

Sometimes it is hard to tell how all those little bra pieces fit together. This post from last week provides an approach to getting everything put together properly. I have been teaching this technique in my bra making workshops and construction errors are nearing zero, so I just had to share!


Machine Stitching Specifications for Bra Making

Our Best Bra Sewing Tips and Tricks

There is a lot of information in the Orange Lingerie sewing pattern instructions about the machine stitches we prefer to use in the Orange Lingerie studio and earlier this month we boiled it all down into a clear, concise blog post with all the settings and photos of the most commonly used stitches for bra making.


Sewing Perfect Seams

Our Best Bra Sewing Tips and Tricks

Bra making requires precision to get the proper fit and support. This post tells you how to get the correct seams for your bra making project.

I would love to hear from you, what is your favorite bra making tip?

Our Best Bra Sewing Tips and Tricks
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Our Best Bra Sewing Tips and Tricks
Our Best Bra Sewing Tips and Tricks
A Method to Make Any Sewing Project Easier

A Method to Make Any Sewing Project Easier

If there was one technique I wish for every sewist to use, it is this one! It works like a charm when sewing any garment but I find it particularly valuable when it comes to bra making. This method has reduced student construction errors in my bra making workshops to almost zero.

What is this method you ask? Dots! Specifically using colored dots to indicate which pieces are to be sewn together. Using dots is especially useful for bra making where the orientation of all those tiny pieces is sometimes, well, a bit puzzling.

Orange Lingerie Method to Make Any Sewing Easier

I think the best way to describe how to use dots for sewing is to show you! Below I have used a variety of dots and dot colors to indicate the areas that match up for sewing for our Boylston bra.

To follow this method, start by laying out the pattern pieces as they will be sewn together. Then apply color dots to the pattern pieces at the points where they connect. For example, all the red points on the left hand side of the picture above will come together. There are already notches at these points, but color coding makes it easier to be sure the pieces are correctly lined up properly for sewing.

Notice that those same points are marked with true blue dots on the right hand side of the picture above. That makes it really clear which lower cup piece will get joined to which upper cup so the right sides and wrong sides of the garment do not get mixed up when sewing.

The above diagram also uses dots also for where the upper cup will be positioned on the bridge (the green dots) as well as the correct band to frame orientation (yellow dots on the left and purple dots on the right). You can even use dots to indicate how the straps are attached as I did above with the sky blue (left) and orange dots (right).

Don’t want to use so many dots? No problem. Below are what I have found to be the most critical dot markers for bra making.

Once you have all the pattern pieces dotted up, you will want to copy that, dot for dot and color for color on your fabric pieces.

Not only does this method improve your accuracy but it also increases sewing speed because you no longer need to go back and forth between your fabric pieces and your pattern pieces to insure your construction is accurate.

Happy bra making!

A Method to Make Any Sewing Project Easier
A Method to Make Any Sewing Project Easier
A Method to Make Any Sewing Project Easier
Machine Stitching Specifications for Bra Making

Machine Stitching Specifications for Bra Making

If you’ve experienced less than favorable results when searching for the perfect fitting bra, then you already know what makes creating your own bras so amazing. It’s the opportunity to not only have the style and fit that you desire but durability as well.

One of the secrets to a bra that lasts through washing and wear is the quality and type of stitching that holds it together. All garments, especially our undergarments are under a lot of stress when worn. In bra making, there are a number of sewing stitches that are used to help increase the functional performance of the garment.

Below I share the most common sewing stitches used in bra making including straight, machine basting, bar tack, regular zigzag, 3-step zigzag, and lightning stitch. I have all the details about each one including when and where to use them, their specifications (length and width, when applicable), also which needle, thread and pressure foot to use!

Stitches for Bra Making #bramaking #brasewing #brapattern #sewingpattern

Machine Stitching Specifications for Bra Making

Note: While there are additional uses for the stitches detailed below, I’ve limited the descriptions to their uses in bra making.

Machine Stitching Specifications for Bra Making

Straight Stitch
Length: 2.3mm
Uses: Seams, topstitching

The straight stitch is the most basic stitch used in sewing for both construction and topstitching. When machine stitching, the straight stitch consists of a straight upper thread interlocking regularly with a straight bobbin thread underneath.

Helpful Tips:

  1. When topstitching the underwire casing, shorten the stitch length to make it easier to go around the curves.
  2. Also, in topstitching, move the needle as necessary to capture the underlying seam allowance.
  3. With ¼” seam allowances, move the needle to the outside of the pressure foot as a guide when sewing. See this blog post for more info: https://www.orange-lingerie.com/how-to-get-perfect-%C2%BC-seams-for-lingerie-sewing



Machine Stitching Specifications for Bra Making

Machine Basting
Length: 4.5mm
Uses: Temporary construction

Machine basting consists of long, loose stitches that are not backstitched to secure their position. This makes the stitches easier to remove when replacing with permanent stitches. Machine basting is useful with garment fitting, or any time you need to hold pieces of fabric together temporarily.

Helpful Tip – When attaching the underwire casing to the cup to frame the seam allowance, it’s easier to use a basting stitch for this step. The casing is then secured to the bra when topstitching.


Machine Stitching Specifications for Bra Making

Bar Tack
Length:  0.3mm length and 4.0 mm in width.
Uses: Sealing casing, attaching straps to the front of the bra, reinforcement, securing ends of elastic together

The bar tack setting on your machine is used to reinforce areas of stress on a garment which makes it a great stitch for sealing casings or attaching straps to the front of the bra. The stitch consists of long, closely-spaced zigzag stitches followed by short perpendicular ones.

Helpful Tips:

  1. Mark the placement of your bar tack with two straight stitches making sure that the lines are straight before adding your bar tack. 
  2. Shorten the length of your zigzag stitches if the bar tack doesn’t look dense enough.



Machine Stitching Specifications for Bra Making

Regular Zigzag
Length: There are so many uses for the zigzag stitch and I like a different setting for each.

  • Elastic application: 1.5mm stitch length by 3.0mm stitch width for attaching elastic
  • 1/8” wide narrow color matched elastic stabilizer:  2.0mm stitch length, 2.5mm stitch width to cover the elastic end to end.
  • Attaching hook and eye to bra: 1.5mm stitch length by 1.5 stitch width (if your machine can perform a zigzag that close to the hooks, otherwise try a lightning or straight stitch, as described in this post.)

Uses:  Stretch seams, sewing elastic, edge finishes

After the straight stitch, the zigzag stitch is the most common. Like the straight stitch, it is multi-functional but also especially useful with stretch fabrics by helping to eliminate thread tears caused by garment stress.


Machine Stitching Specifications for Bra Making

3-step Zigzag
Length: 1.5mm stitch length by 5.0mm stitch width
Uses: installing elastic, finishing seam edges

Although the regular zigzag stitch is great as a stretch stitch, it can sometimes cause delicate fabrics to bunch up or elastic to lose some of its stretch which causes it to pucker or not lay flat. The 3-step zig zag is a flatter, stronger stitch that adds an additional layer of durability to your bra. It’s a great choice if you have the option available on your machine.

Helpful Tips – The 3-step zigzag stitch can be difficult to remove, test on your materials and double check your construction before sewing!


Machine Stitching Specifications for Bra Making

Lightning Stitch
Length: Machine setting or by combining a small stitch length (<1mm) with a small stitch width (<1mm) if the stitch is not an option on your machine
Uses: stretch seams

The lightning stitch (also called the stretch stitch) is a narrow zigzag stitch used for sewing stretchy fabrics. The up and down motion of the stitch (as opposed to the standard side to side of the regular zigzag stitch) helps to reduce puckering

Helpful Tips – The lightning stitch can be difficult to remove, test on your materials and baste your seams before using.

___

Here is a short list of tools and notions to make sewing all of the stitches above easier.

  • A standard throat plate is recommended for bra making, not the single hole throat plate because zigzag stitching is necessary.

As always happy bra making!!

Machine Stitching Specifications for Bra Making
Machine Stitching Specifications for Bra Making
Machine Stitching Specifications for Bra Making
How to Alter Orange Lingerie's Devonshire Bra Lace Cups for Fabric

How to Alter Devonshire Lace Cups for Fabric

How to Alter Devonshire Lace Cups for Fabric

The Devonshire love continues! This week I have a tutorial for converting the cup from using lace to using fabric. This conversion allows you to carry through your fabric print (or solid) through the entire front of the bra like the scuba fabric Devonshire pictured above. This alteration is also a great workaround for when you are using an allover lace that does not have a scallop edge.

Before we dive in, remember all pattern changes are from the seam or trim lines and then the cutting line is established by adding your seam or trim allowance. Also, be sure to label your pattern pieces. You need to know what those pieces are for, especially if you are interrupted and need to set your project aside.

Now the overall approach to convert the cup to use fabric, is to add a trim allowance to allow you to stabilize and neatly finish the cup in the absence of a lace scallop edge.

Begin by taping both cup pieces to some tracing or pattern paper. Now, measure up the width of the trim elastic you use for the underarm. That same trim can be used to finish the upper cup. I really like this approach since it does not require any additional materials.

For my bra patterns the trim allowance for the underarm area is ⅜” for A to C cups and ½” for cup sizes D and greater. These are always marked on all our bra patterns so you can clearly see the trim allowance allowed and understand where to alter the pattern.

Now if you want to get fancy, you can take this a step further and reshape the upper cup. Without lace, we no longer need that straight line at the top of the cup and that allows us to add some contouring.

To get the curvy inner upper cup below, I measured the total width of the inner lower cup pattern piece along the upper edge (the solid black line at the top of the cup in between the seam lines). I then measured 75% of the distance away from the center of the overall cup and marked a point ¼” above the top edge of the cup.

To get the new curved line, I drew a smooth arcing convex line from the non-notched side of the inner cup (where it attaches to the bridge) and transitioned the line to a concave line toward the notched side of the inner cup (where it attaches to the outer cup).

You could even curve the top of the outer cup down a tiny bit (I used ⅛” below) as you move to the center of that pattern piece, bringing the line back up the existing top edge of the upper cup as you get to the underarm.

If you do decide to get fancy and add this kind of contouring to your cup, check your upper cup curve to be sure it is continuous and smooth all the way across by putting the cup pieces together along the top edge as if they were sewn.

When you go to sew the bra, apply elastic to finish the upper cup as directed for the underarm area. This application is made to the top of the completed upper cup and lining combination.

Yet another great option for your next Devonshire bra!

How to Alter Devonshire Lace Cups for Fabric
How to Alter Devonshire Lace Cups for Fabric